Chapter 6 – Pathways to Nuclear Terror and Key Actors: Assessing the Risk

Open Sources (Available to all)
  1. Byman, D. (2015). State sponsor of terror: Iran as global threat. Prepared testimony to House Foreign Affairs Committee Subcommittee on Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade. Retrieved from https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/11-byman-iran-testimony.pdf.
  2. Forest, J. J.F. (2012). Framework for analyzing the future threat of WMD terrorism. Journal of Strategic Security, 5(4), 51-68. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/jss/vol5/iss4/9/.
  3. House, C., (2016). The CBRN Terrorism Threat from the Islamic State, Military Review, Sept/Oct 2016. Retrieved from https://www.armyupress.army.mil/Journals/Military-Review/English-Edition-Archives/September-October-2016/.
  4. Medalia, J. (2011). “Dirty bombs”: Technical background, attack prevention and response, issues for Congress (CRS Report No. R41890) [June 24]. Retrieved from https://fas.org/sgp/crs/nuke/R41890.pdf.
  5. MacCalman, M. (2016) A.Q. Khan nuclear smuggling network. Journal of Strategic Security, 9(1), 104-118. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/jss/vol9/iss1/9/.
  6. Nuclear Threat Initiative. (2016). Nuclear Security Index: Building a Framework for Assurance, Accountability, and Action (3rded). Retrieved from http://www.ntiindex.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/NTI_2016-Index-Report_MAR-25-2.pdf.
  7. Sokolski, H. (2014). Nuclear weapons gone missing: What does history teach? The Strategic Studies Institute Publications Office, United States Army War College Press. Retrieved from https://ssi.armywarcollege.edu/nuclear-weapons-materials-gone-missing-what-does-history-teach/
Additional Readings (Available to OSU Students through the OSU Valley Library)
  1. Allison, G., & Tobey, W. H. (2016). Could there be a terrorist Fukushima. New York Times (April 4). Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/05/opinion/could-there-be-a-terrorist-fukushima.html.
  2. Kuperman, A. J. (2013). Nuclear terrorism and global security: The challenge of phasing out highly enriched uranium. New York, NY: Routledge. OSU Library E-book, https://search.library.oregonstate.edu/permalink/f/ueodtl/CP71310148450001451.
  3. Lawlor, B. (2011). The Black Sea: Center of the nuclear black market. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 2011. Retrieved from https://search.library.oregonstate.edu/permalink/f/1g9lfhc/TN_informaworld_s10_1177_0096340211426506.
  4. Lieber K., & Press, D. (2013). “Why States Won’t Give Nuclear Weapons to Terrorists,” International Security [June]. Retrieved from https://search.library.oregonstate.edu/permalink/f/1g9lfhc/TN_mitpress10.1162/ISEC_a_00127.
  5. Potter, W. C., Ferguson, C. D., & Spect, L. S. (2004). The four faces of nuclear terror and the need for a prioritized response. Foreign Affairs [May/June]. Retrieved from https://search.library.oregonstate.edu/permalink/f/1g9lfhc/TN_proquest214296764.
  6. Rezaei, F. (2016). Shopping for Armageddon: Islamist groups and nuclear terror. Middle East Policy, 23(3), 112-132. Retrieved from https://search.library.oregonstate.edu/permalink/f/1g9lfhc/TN_wj10.1111/mepo.12221.

 

Additional Readings from above available to students outside of OSU through different links:

64. Allison, G., & Tobey, W. H. (2016). Could there be a terrorist Fukushima. New York Times (April 4). Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/05/opinion/could-there-be-a-terrorist-fukushima.html.

69. Lieber K., & Press, D. (2013). Why States Won’t Give Nuclear Weapons to Terrorists,” International Security [June]. Retrieved from https://www.belfercenter.org/publication/why-states-wont-give-nuclear-weapons-terrorists

71. Rezaei, F. (2016). Shopping for Armageddon: Islamist groups and nuclear terror. Middle East Policy, 23(3), 112-132. Retrieved from https://www.mepc.org/journal/shopping-armageddon-islamist-groups-and-nuclear-terror

 

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Nuclear Security: Countering the Threat From States and Non-State Actors by David Bernell, Meredith Bowers & Ben Wickizer is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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